Arctic Monkeys hit U.S. on a wave of hype

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Arctic Monkeys hit U.S. on a wave of hype

Postby arctic » Sat Feb 18, 2006 2:47 pm

    Arctic Monkeys, "Whatever People Say I Am, That's What I'm Not," (Domino)

    The Arctic Monkeys are the latest in a continuing stream of British exports that wash up on American shores wrapped in reams of hype.

    But, hey, hey, these Monkeys are different.

    The title of their debut, "Whatever People Say I Am, That's What I'm Not," should tell you that. And people have been saying plenty about the Arctic Monkeys, especially since their album last month became the fastest-selling debut in British history.

    And Britain has, if memory serves, produced a couple of decent bands.

    Oddly, the Arctic Monkeys aren't really that exceptional from groups like Franz Ferdinand or the Strokes, and are well in line with the current batch of `70s-inspired, buoyant punk.

    But while the Arctic Monkeys might not sound radical, that doesn't mean they aren't excellent. And, man, do they have a single: "I Bet You Look Good on the Dancefloor."

    Like all great singles, "Dancefloor" is euphorically catchy - a drug that will make repeat listens a legitimate addiction. The song is a monster.

    It opens with a fast, heavy-metal riff that politely pauses a moment so the lead guitar can catch up and whip itself into a proper frenzy - and then they're off. The next three minutes are an unrelenting onslaught.

    "Lighting the fuse might result in a bang, with a bang-o," sings Alex Turner, who knows how to stutter like a rock star.

    But the Arctic Monkeys - who number four, formed at art school and are infuriatingly young (Turner is 20) - aren't a one-hit wonder. "Whatever" boasts more grade-A rock stomp on "Fake Tales of San Francisco," "Red Light Indicates Doors Are Secured" and "When The Sun Goes Down."

    They also show versatility on elegant, upbeat ballads like "Mardy Bum" and "A Certain Romance."

    It's true, however, that the Monkeys' anthems about "scummy" men and "totalitarian" bouncers will always sound best blasted in booze-soaked pubs. The morning after you might reach for something that doesn't urge you to "put on your dancing shoes," but by nightfall, you'll be guiltily spinning "Whatever" again.

    The Arctic Monkeys have started off their career with a bang-o.



I didn't think this was worth of latest news, but interesting to see what the yanks think of the band.
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Postby Exclamation Marc » Sat Feb 18, 2006 4:24 pm

I actually fear they get too successful, too mainstream, and everyone starts jumping on the bandwagon. But then again, if it wasn't for their hype, I mightn't even have made my way to this place :oops:
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No worries

Postby heidyvasquez » Sun Feb 19, 2006 8:43 pm

Well actually, for all the hype um... everywhere else. Here in Southern cali. I
don't think many have ever even heard of them. They are regulated to being known by word of mouth especially by myspace. I found out about them a couple days ago on itunes (UK version). They're pretty cool. I have 2 songs on my ipod.
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Postby surrey_casual » Sun Feb 19, 2006 8:48 pm

welcome heidi. southeren cali....mmmmm.....redondo beach brings back some memories, anyways, what do you think of them?
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Postby heidyvasquez » Sun Feb 19, 2006 8:54 pm

They sound different. It's a good thing though :D I like the clash, franz ferdinand, and the smiths...and they have a similar melody all rolled up in one but with their own personal stamp on it. When I first heard it on itunes, I was like whta the hell is this? Those brits have overreacted yet again. J/K But, I bought "I bet you look good on the dancefloor" and i started liking it.
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Postby surrey_casual » Sun Feb 19, 2006 8:59 pm

i recommend purchasing the album, its well worth the £8! i do believe they are playing gigs in cali on the following.....dunno if there are tix left

Mon 13 april Great American Music HallSan Francisco, CA
Wed 15 april Henry Fonda TheatreLos Angeles, CA

welcome to the forum, if you would like more music pm me!
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Postby heidyvasquez » Sun Feb 19, 2006 9:17 pm

You are most righteous. Thanks abunch
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Postby surrey_casual » Sun Feb 19, 2006 9:20 pm

no worry's.........

also check out the www.bromheadsjacket.com better than the monkeys in my opinion
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Postby heidyvasquez » Sun Feb 19, 2006 9:24 pm

Found this article in TIME mag. How US responds to hype in UK (it's really long SORRY)

A Barrel of Monkeys
A new British band comes to the U.S. on a wave of hype--and deserves every ounce of it
By JOSH TYRANGIEL


Posted Sunday, Feb. 12, 2006
For all their stiff-upper-lip stoicism, the British go cuckoo for Cocoa Puffs over any native band that can gin up three chords and an attitude. The latest kings of England are the Arctic Monkeys, four lads who got guitars for Christmas in 2001, mastered them quickly, toured the country and handed out home-burned CDs of songs that were then uploaded to the unsigned-band portal MySpace.com Their following metastasized to the point that the band sold out the famed London Astoria last year on word of mouth. When a record-company bidding war ensued, the Arctic Monkeys signed with independent label Domino for a tidy sum and in January released their debut album in Britain, Whatever People Say I Am, That's What I'm Not, which not only is the fastest-selling British debut ever but was also voted by readers of the influential New Musical Express as the fifth greatest British album--of ALL TIME!-- topping, among others, the Beatles' Revolver and the Clash's London Calling.

The instinctive response to this outbreak of British euphoria is condescension. (It's fun to switch cultural roles once in a while, no?) Americans who don't love music can sniff at the band's impossible youth--two of the Arctic Monkeys are 19, two are 20--and refrigerator-poetry name. Music lovers need only glance at dusty albums by Oasis, Super Furry Animals, the Prodigy and Bloc Party to remind themselves that the Brits routinely mistake mediocrity for greatness. Here's the thing, though: this time there's no mistake. Whatever People Say I Am, due out in the U.S. on Feb. 21, isn't perfect, but it's a great rock album that spotlights a new lyricist who is whip smart, funny and appealingly dangerous. He does a lot to restore faith in rock's future.

The music itself makes no great claims to originality. The Arctic Monkeys' lo-fi guitar jags are cribbed from the Strokes and Franz Ferdinand (who cribbed them from Lou Reed and Television and so on), and the band's ska rhythms and martial drums come courtesy of the Clash. But singer-guitarist Alex Turner, guitarist Jamie Cook, drummer Matt Helders and bassist Andy Nicholson play with a swagger that obliterates any trace of ancestor worship. They aren't referencing anything as they fly through tunes like The View from the Afternoon; they're just playing as many hooks as possible, as fast and as cleanly as they can.Turner's voice is dry and laconic, and he seldom strays from his middle range, but flourishes would only distract from some of the best lyrics ever written by someone who still lives with his parents. On the punk hurricane I Bet You Look Good on the Dancefloor, he yelps, "Oh, there ain't no love, no, Montagues or Capulets/ Just banging tunes in DJ sets and/ Dirty dance floors and dreams of naughtiness," while the song title You Probably Couldn't See for the Lights but You Were Staring Straight at Me gets a laugh on its own. Turner is particularly good at setting scenes at the top of songs--"Up rolled the riot van/ And sparked excitement in the boys/ But the policemen look annoyed/ Perhaps these are ones they should avoid"--and with each couplet he swings between disgust at and tolerance of the boozy, materialistic and louche world around him. On the standout A Certain Romance, Turner looks around the pub and begins, "Oh they might wear classic Reeboks/ Or knackered Converse/ Or tracky bottoms tucked in socks/ But all of that's what the point is not/ The point's that there isn't no romance around there." But by the end of the song, he admits that a lot of those hopeless, materialistic and thoroughly sauced people are his friends and that "They might overstep the line/ But you just cannot get angry in the same way."

Whatever People Say I Am is the sound of smart kids doing stupid things, with a dawning recognition that maybe life has more to offer than drinking and hooking up. Perhaps the best thing about it is that it has no interest in speaking to anyone over 30. It's great for family dynamics that parents and kids can listen to Coldplay together, but it's a terrible thing for rock 'n' roll, which needs rebellion to survive. (Ever wonder why hip-hop is doing so well?) Parents will be freaked by Turner's wry narration of a life that could go either way, but kids will hear someone speaking their language, if not their dialect.
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Postby surrey_casual » Sun Feb 19, 2006 9:29 pm

mmmmmm......average, nice to see an amercian review
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Postby heidyvasquez » Sun Feb 19, 2006 10:12 pm

I think it was in the same issue tht our vice oresident shot someone while hunting.

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Postby heidyvasquez » Sun Feb 19, 2006 10:27 pm

checked out bromheads jacket. they are better. i liked them and tried to find them on itunes with no luck. which means i cant get it on my ipod. damn!
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Postby arctic » Sun Feb 19, 2006 11:12 pm

heidyvasquez wrote:checked out bromheads jacket. they are better. i liked them and tried to find them on itunes with no luck. which means i cant get it on my ipod. damn!


download their demos for free, they aint released owt on itunes yet thats why mate
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Postby Exclamation Marc » Mon Feb 20, 2006 8:12 am

heidyvasquez wrote:Found this article in TIME mag. How US responds to hype in UK (it's really long SORRY)

A Barrel of Monkeys
A new British band comes to the U.S. on a wave of hype--and deserves every ounce of it
By JOSH TYRANGIEL


Posted Sunday, Feb. 12, 2006
For all their stiff-upper-lip stoicism, the British go cuckoo for Cocoa Puffs over any native band that can gin up three chords and an attitude. The latest kings of England are the Arctic Monkeys, four lads who got guitars for Christmas in 2001, mastered them quickly, toured the country and handed out home-burned CDs of songs that were then uploaded to the unsigned-band portal MySpace.com Their following metastasized to the point that the band sold out the famed London Astoria last year on word of mouth. When a record-company bidding war ensued, the Arctic Monkeys signed with independent label Domino for a tidy sum and in January released their debut album in Britain, Whatever People Say I Am, That's What I'm Not, which not only is the fastest-selling British debut ever but was also voted by readers of the influential New Musical Express as the fifth greatest British album--of ALL TIME!-- topping, among others, the Beatles' Revolver and the Clash's London Calling.

The instinctive response to this outbreak of British euphoria is condescension. (It's fun to switch cultural roles once in a while, no?) Americans who don't love music can sniff at the band's impossible youth--two of the Arctic Monkeys are 19, two are 20--and refrigerator-poetry name. Music lovers need only glance at dusty albums by Oasis, Super Furry Animals, the Prodigy and Bloc Party to remind themselves that the Brits routinely mistake mediocrity for greatness. Here's the thing, though: this time there's no mistake. Whatever People Say I Am, due out in the U.S. on Feb. 21, isn't perfect, but it's a great rock album that spotlights a new lyricist who is whip smart, funny and appealingly dangerous. He does a lot to restore faith in rock's future.

The music itself makes no great claims to originality. The Arctic Monkeys' lo-fi guitar jags are cribbed from the Strokes and Franz Ferdinand (who cribbed them from Lou Reed and Television and so on), and the band's ska rhythms and martial drums come courtesy of the Clash. But singer-guitarist Alex Turner, guitarist Jamie Cook, drummer Matt Helders and bassist Andy Nicholson play with a swagger that obliterates any trace of ancestor worship. They aren't referencing anything as they fly through tunes like The View from the Afternoon; they're just playing as many hooks as possible, as fast and as cleanly as they can.Turner's voice is dry and laconic, and he seldom strays from his middle range, but flourishes would only distract from some of the best lyrics ever written by someone who still lives with his parents. On the punk hurricane I Bet You Look Good on the Dancefloor, he yelps, "Oh, there ain't no love, no, Montagues or Capulets/ Just banging tunes in DJ sets and/ Dirty dance floors and dreams of naughtiness," while the song title You Probably Couldn't See for the Lights but You Were Staring Straight at Me gets a laugh on its own. Turner is particularly good at setting scenes at the top of songs--"Up rolled the riot van/ And sparked excitement in the boys/ But the policemen look annoyed/ Perhaps these are ones they should avoid"--and with each couplet he swings between disgust at and tolerance of the boozy, materialistic and louche world around him. On the standout A Certain Romance, Turner looks around the pub and begins, "Oh they might wear classic Reeboks/ Or knackered Converse/ Or tracky bottoms tucked in socks/ But all of that's what the point is not/ The point's that there isn't no romance around there." But by the end of the song, he admits that a lot of those hopeless, materialistic and thoroughly sauced people are his friends and that "They might overstep the line/ But you just cannot get angry in the same way."

Whatever People Say I Am is the sound of smart kids doing stupid things, with a dawning recognition that maybe life has more to offer than drinking and hooking up. Perhaps the best thing about it is that it has no interest in speaking to anyone over 30. It's great for family dynamics that parents and kids can listen to Coldplay together, but it's a terrible thing for rock 'n' roll, which needs rebellion to survive. (Ever wonder why hip-hop is doing so well?) Parents will be freaked by Turner's wry narration of a life that could go either way, but kids will hear someone speaking their language, if not their dialect.


Yea I read this too. Actually, in the issue a week before this one, there was one snippet about AM's album being the best selling debut in history, heh. Didn't like how they took the mickey of Oasis though
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Postby surrey_casual » Mon Feb 20, 2006 6:55 pm

arctic wrote:
heidyvasquez wrote:checked out bromheads jacket. they are better. i liked them and tried to find them on itunes with no luck. which means i cant get it on my ipod. damn!


download their demos for free, they aint released owt on itunes yet thats why mate


check it out heidi....

http://savefile.com/projects/546495

enjoy
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